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Washington residents may be wary of social media during divorce

| Sep 11, 2015 | High-Asset Divorce |

When many Washington residents think about social media, they typically consider the function to be self-explanatory: sites are used to be social. However, the information posted on social media sites could have a greater impact on an individual’s life than he or she may have originally realized. For parties who are going through divorce, their social media activity could play a considerable role. 

For individuals who are facing a high-asset divorce, some of the most important aspects of the situation could deal with finances. These aspects may include property division, alimony or child support. In many cases, parties may attempt to prove why they may require a certain amount of support or why they may be entitled to certain assets. However, if they post pictures or information on social media that reveals that they have been spending money on expensive gifts or other untoward expenses, their case could be negatively affected.

Furthermore, while posting can have possible negative effects, deleting information could also prove detrimental. Information on social media accounts could possibly be used as evidence in divorce cases, and if parties attempt to delete information, they may face issues for tampering with evidence. Therefore, individuals may wish to simply refrain from making posts during divorce proceedings.

When it comes to divorce, especially ones where there could be tension over certain issues, various information could be considered important to the case. Therefore, Washington residents may wish to better understand what information could play a role in their divorce proceedings. Learning more about how social media and other accounts are handled by the court could prove beneficial.

Source: Fox Business, “Can Social Media Hurt You in a Divorce?“, Andrea Murad, Aug. 27, 2015